The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Synopsis: A white woman writes the lives of the black women who work for her and her friends in early 1960s Jackson, Mississippi. Review: After having a half a dozen people recommend The Help, and then not being able to find it at the library, I decided to take the plunge and buy myself a shiny new hardcover copy. I went in with low expectations, because more often than not I’m disappointed by these kinds of books. Thank goodness I listened to my very smart…

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Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

Synopsis: A professional “carer” recalls her idyllic school days, which mask a horror that she and her friends “know but don’t know.” Review: Never Let Me Go is one of my favorite all-time books, and this is the third time I’ve read it. Big life upheavals, like having a baby, always send me back to books I know I’ll enjoy, as a way to comfort myself through a major life transition. If you’ve read it, you’ll know that it’s a strange one to read while…

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The Secret History by Donna Tartt

Synopsis: A group of misfit classics students at a small Northeastern college take things too far. Review: Love The Secret History! Have read it at least 3 maybe 4 times since it came out back when I was in college. And that’s all I have to say because I finished it at 11pm and had my 2nd baby at 3:20am and I’m a bit too tired to blog 🙂 Share on Facebook

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Wayfarer by RJ Anderson

Synopsis: A rogue fairy escapes her magical world and teams up with a regular boy in order to save Faery and the human world from a devastating threat. Review: Wayfarer might be a fairy story, but it’s mostly set in the normal world and works very hard to keep things grounded and as realistic as possible. I have to admit that I was more engaged by the relationship between Linden and Timothy than anything else that was going on. Wayfarer is the sequel to Faery…

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Wolf’s Brother by Megan Lindholm

Synopsis: As a group of reindeer herdspeople approach their summer grounds, simmering tensions and unspoken accusations bubble up with murderous results. Review: Wolf’s Brother is the completion of the story begun in The Reindeer People, and I was more than satisfied with the resolution. While the book’s setting recalls Clan of the Cave Bear, the story itself focuses around what could be considered a murder mystery, and the genre-blending is what really kept me turning pages. Megan Lindholm brings the action to a thrilling climax…

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The Reindeer People by Megan Lindholm

Synopsis: An outcast healer and her shaman-bewitched son become caught up in the politics and intrigue among a group of reindeer herdsman. Review: The Reindeer People is only the first part of the story, and ends on a most incomplete note, so I’m glad that I’ve got Wolf’s Brother on hand to start immediately. I really hate that publishers do this–I’d much rather read one long book than wait for a second installment. This is one of Megan Lindholm/Robin Hobb’s earliest works, and in it…

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My Name is Memory by Ann Brashares

Synopsis: Reincarnation dooms Daniel and Sophia to wander the centuries, falling in love with tragic results in just a few but missing each other in most, and when they find themselves in high school together they just might be able to break the cycle and be together. Review: I find the concept of reincarnation tedious and frustrating, so I’m probably not exactly the ideal reader for My Name Is Memory. And now that I’m a mom, I like it even less. I don’t want to…

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The Son Avenger by Sigrid Undset (The Master of Hestviken)

Synopsis: With Olav Audunsson facing the end of his lonely days, his children Eirik and Cecilia find themselves trapped in the repercussions of Olav’s as-yet unconfessed sins. Review: There was so much I loved in The Son Avenger, particularly Cecilia’s journey of wife- and motherhood with Eirik’s less-than-reputable childhood friend Jorund. She really came alive as a different kind of woman than the others I’ve seen in Undset’s work, with a rigidity that blossomed into self-awareness and even a kind of independence. She’s mirrored nicely…

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